Friday, January 11, 2019

Filipino Fried Spring Rolls

One of our favorite appetizer is Lumpiang Prito or Fried Spring Rolls. Inside these rolls is  a mixture of different vegetables of your choice, sauteed and seasoned well. These rolls are fried in hot oil and best eaten while its hot together with the dipping sauce. Lumpiang Prito is supposedly vegetables only but in my case I always add ground chicken or pork. Also, the addition of sweet potato is very good because it gives a little starchy sweetness that is just perfect with the dipping sauce.

Here's a little information based on our history:

Lumpia are pastries of Chinese origin similar to fresh popiah or fried spring rolls popular in Southeast Asia. The term lumpia derives from Hokkien lunpia (Chinese: 潤餅; pinyin: rùnbǐng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: jūn-piáⁿ, lūn-piáⁿ), which is an alternate term for popiah. The recipe, both fried and fresh versions, was brought by the Chinese immigrants from the Fujian province of China to Southeast Asia and became popular where they settled in Indonesia and the Philippines.

In the Netherlands and Flanders, it is spelled loempia which is the old Indonesian spelling for lumpia and has also become the generic name for "spring roll" in Dutch. A variant is the Vietnamese lumpia, wrapped in a thinner piece of pastry, in a size close to a spring roll though, the wrapping closes the ends off completely, which is typical for lumpia.

Filipino Varieties:

Lumpiang Hubád
Lumpiang Hubád literally means naked spring roll. It is basically an unwrapped Lumpiang Sariwà (without the crepe).

Lumpiang Sariwà
Lumpiang Sariwà, or fresh spring rolls in English, consist of minced ubod (heart of palm), flaked chicken, crushed peanuts, and turnips as an extender in a double wrapping of lettuce leaf and a yellowish egg crepe. The accompanying sauce is made from chicken or pork stock, a starch mixture, and fresh garlic. This variety is not fried and is usually around 2 inches in diameter and 6 inches in length; it is also the most popular among the Filipino variants[citation needed]. It is derived from the original Chinese popiah.

Lumpiang Shanghai
This type of lumpia is filled with ground pork or beef, minced onion, carrots, and spices with the mixture held together by beaten egg. It may sometimes contain green peas, cilantro (Chinese parsley or coriander) or raisins. Both lumpiang shanghai and the sweet and sour sauce are served which attests to the Chinese influence. This variety is by standard an inch in diameter and approximately 4-6 inches in length. However, most restaurants and street vendors often serve lumpia shanghai in smaller diameters, typically one-half to three-quarter inches, and is served with a spicy sauce instead of a sweet and sour sauce

Lumpiang Prito/Lumpiang Gulay
Lumpiang Prito literally means fried spring roll. It consists of a briskly fried pancake filled with bean sprouts and various other vegetables such as string beans and carrots. Small morsels of meat or seafood may also be added. Though it is the least expensive of the variants, the preparation – the cutting of vegetables and meats into appropriately small pieces and subsequent pre-cooking – may prove taxing and labor-intensive. This variant may come in sizes as little as that of lumpiang shanghai or as big as that of lumpiang sariwà. It is usually eaten with vinegar and chili peppers, or a soy sauce-and-calamondin juice mixture known as toyo-mansi.

Lumpiang Ubod
This is another variation of the Filipino spring rolls which is made from coconut julienne or heart of palm. Lumpiang Ubod is a specialty of Silay City, Negros Occidental.
Banana Lumpia or Turón Main article: Turrón (Filipino cuisine)
Banana lumpia or Turón is a Philippine dessert, made of thinly sliced bananas (preferably ripe plantains), a slice of jackfruit, dusted with brown sugar, rolled in a papery wrapper and fried. Brown sugar is further added while frying for additional sweetness.

Popularity
Lumpia has such enduring popularity that one can see at least one variant in almost any set of Filipino or Indonesian festivities. Its distinct taste and ease of preparation (the Shanghai variant at least) has caused it to be one of the staple food products on the menus of many Filipino restaurants in the United States/Philippines and in some parts of the world where Filipino resides.

Ingredients:
250 grams ground chicken or pork ( optional )
3 tbsp soy sauce
2 tbsp sugar
3 tbsp mirin
2 tbsp oil
1 onion medium chopped
3 clove garlic grated
1 tsp ginger juice
1 cup carrot julienne cut
1 cup baguio beans julienne cut
1 cup mongo bean sprout
1 cup sweet potato small cubes
1 cup cabbage thinly sliced
1 tsp ground white pepper
salt to taste
1 cup oil or more for deep frying
20 pcs shanghai rolls wrapper

Direction:
First, marinate the ground chicken/pork with the combination of soy sauce, sugar, mirin and ginger juice. Set aside in the fridge for about 15 to 30 minutes.
Next, put the chicken/pork in the pan or wok and cook for about 7 to 10 minutes. Set aside
Using the same pan or wok, put two tbsp of sunflower oil, saute onion and garlic.
Then add the veggies except cabbage and mongo bean sprout.
Mix properly and cook for about 3 minutes in medium heat.
Next, add the cooked ground chicken/pork including the sauce from its bowl, mix properly and add cabbage and mongo bean sprouts. Cook for about 3 minutes. 
Season/add pepper and salt to taste. Turn off the heat and cool to room temperature.
Put 2 or 3 tbsp at the center of the shanghai wrapper and deep fry in a hot oil.

For the Sauce:
3 tbsp apple cider vinegar
3 cloves garlic chopped
fish sauce
salt
freshly ground peppercorns
chopped fresh red chili (optional)

Combine the above ingredients for the sauce. Adjust the taste according to your preference.

Here is the sauteed ingredients..fresh,colorful and a little chaos but its alright..the more the merrier...

The precious wrapper is ready..so white and creamy..especially if its homemade but I don't have the time to make my homemade wrapper so let there be a store bought package for easy and fast rolls at home...Just a tablespoon or two is what you need in order to enjoy a big mouthful bite of this precious rolls...

Now you can start making the precious rolls...I cant wait to get them done..I am so excited and hungry at the same time...

Yes! I am finally sealing my rolls..I am careful not to forget this process or else...each rolls will open up while frying and its kinda frustrating to see your rolls just like that...

Oh my..here they are...magnificent..I don't mind the differences..as long as they are sealed and I am hungry. My hunger will not mind its imperfection...in my eyes, they are so lovely and perfect..


Hmmmmnnn, just look at them, golden brown, crispy and I hope you don't mind the addition of sweet potato, its fabulous...I love its sweetness and the chaos between the veggies and meat is perfect.,

If you are wondering what Lumpia wrapper is, I used the above photo. Of course, nothing will beat the original homemade wrapper. I grew up with it but here in Singapore I can only settle with this one.


Where's the Party?




15 comments:

  1. They look so good . You make the best food dishes . Hugs and blessings, Cindy

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    Replies
    1. Dear Cindy..thank you, as always I look forward for your visit. Take care and best regards to the family.

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  2. I love spring rolls, and the sweet potato sounds very interesting for the filling. Thanks for sharing, MarEliz!

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  3. Years ago my high school Vietnamese students taught me how to make these - We held a yearly multicultural festival at school and their families came in to help prepare the foods! it was always a special time! These look delish!!!

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  4. Hmmmmm, my Filipino daughter-in-law makes fabulous pancit with shrimp and quail eggs and these rolls...which are so delicious for our family get-togethers. It's quite the change when we have a full roasted pig for the holidays, but so delicious! My husband and I are German and Danish decent--but who can turn down pancit!

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  5. These look awesome!! Thanks for sharing at the What's for Dinner party. I love the things you bring.

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  6. These look so yummy. Thanks for sharing this recipe at Cooking and Crafting with J&J.

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  7. Those look so yummy. Thanks for sharing. #alittlebitofeverything

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  8. Yummm lumpia is the best!! Happy Fiesta Friday :)

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  9. I'm going to have to try these! My husband is Vietnamese, and we love making Vietnamese spring rolls. I love the variation in these though. Will be putting it on the menu soon! Thanks so much for sharing at Sweet inspiration!

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  10. I've not a spring roll in ages and you have just reminded me on how much I love them. Your look so tasty.

    Thanks for sharing at Last weeks Creative Mondays :) Hope you can join us tomorrow.

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  11. I love spring rolls and you make it look so easy. I will be trying your recipe very soon! Hope you are having a great week and staying warm. Thanks so much for sharing with us at Full Plate Thursday and come back soon!
    Miz Helen

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  12. I love to make fried spring rolls - they're so delicious! Thanks for sharing your recipe at Sew It Cook It Craft It. You're my feature at today's link party!

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